FREEDOM FOR FOOD TRUCKS

Food trucks are important vehicles for economic opportunity. They were already popular before the COVID-19 pandemic, but when restaurants faced capacity restrictions and other regulations during the pandemic, many aspiring entrepreneurs responded by starting food truck businesses.

But instead of celebrating this entrepreneurship serving their communities, many local governments made it difficult—if not impossible—for these small business owners to operate.

Food trucks must navigate a patchwork of state and local regulations in every city where they serve customers, even if they are operating on private property. Local regulations vary from city to city, and food trucks must also pay fees and get licenses and permits in multiple cities. This system creates needless burdens for food truck operators.

But a new bill simplifies these requirements, allowing food trucks that hold a state health permit and a local fire permit to serve customers on private property with the permission of the property owner without having to secure additional licenses and permits from every city where they operate.

It also balances private property rights with local control. Food trucks would still need to get local licenses and permits to operate on streets and public property. By streamlining licensing requirements for food trucks that operate on private property at the state level, the bill will remove unnecessary regulatory barriers that food trucks and private property owners currently face and create jobs and opportunity in the state.

Food Truck Freedom

Food trucks must navigate a patchwork of state and local regulations in every city where they serve customers, even if they are operating on private property. Local regulations vary from city to city, and food trucks must also pay fees and get licenses and permits in multiple cities. This system creates needless burdens for food truck operators.